Главная Журнал «Россия и Запад: диалог культур» Главная Рубрики Актуальные проблемы регионоведения Nataliya Karelina "Canadian Studies at the Faculty of Foreign Languages and Area Studies of Lomonosov Moscow State University"

Nataliya Karelina "Canadian Studies at the Faculty of Foreign Languages and Area Studies of Lomonosov Moscow State University"

Nataliya A. Karelina –

PhD in Geography, Associate Professor

Faculty of Foreign Languages and Area Studies

Lomonosov Moscow State University

Tel.: (495)734-00-80

E-mail: nata.msu@gmail.com

Canadian Studies at the Faculty of Foreign Languages and Area Studies of Lomonosov Moscow State University


The course of Canadian Studies at the Faculty of Foreign Languages and Area Studies of Lomonosov Moscow State University is an interdisciplinary exploration of the concepts and practices concerning Canada’s history, geography, population, economy and culture. It has been taught for more than 10 years to the 2nd and the 3d year students of different departments.  It is aimed at students gaining an appreciation of Canada’s amazing diversity as well as its regional complexity. Regional approach is widely used while teaching. It allows students to compare different regions of Canada with those of Russia. Students have to understand the factors that have determined each region’s character, set the direction of its development, and created a sense of place. Another key element of the course is the content-based language instruction (CBI) which helps students to improve and enlarge their knowledge of English. Such program proves to be very successful in terms of results and appreciation.

Key words: Canadian studies, regional approach, diversity, content-based language instruction


Canadian Studies have been taught at the faculty of foreign languages and area studies for more than 10 years. The first course devoted to Canada was developed at the end of 1990s as part of another course “The world of the English language” – a new course for Russian students which differed a lot from other courses devoted to the studies of English-speaking countries, their geography, history or culture as its goal was to combine all these disciplines and explain everything that happened to the country and its language in different periods of time and may happen in the future. This new course immediately became of great importance to Russian students at that time. It was the time of instability and serious changes in all spheres of life: economy, politics and education. Former educational programs were revised and new ones appeared. The faculty of foreign languages (later in 2003 it became the faculty of foreign languages and area studies) was quite young at the university. It was formed only in 1988. So the staff of it tried to keep up to date in terms of new demands and develop new programs which would help students to learn different aspects of the language and its usage.

At first the course “The world of the English language” included British and American studies and then it was added by Canadian studies. The first teachers Aleksandr Vaschenko and Tatiana Pivovarova that started to give lectures on Canada faced a lot of challenges, e.g. the shortage of information about the country, few books or articles devoted to the country. Everything they could get was some guide books or some brochures for tourists. And at that time not many people could get an access to the Internet. The Embassy of Canada to Russia and the Institute of the USA and Canada in Moscow helped to solve the problem and provided their sources of information. Sometimes some of their staff gave lectures to the students of the faculty.

All in all, the course of Canadian Studies has become one of the most popular among the students of the faculty. The number of course papers and diploma projects has steadily grown over these years. More and more students choose Canada as the country of their specialization and study it in detail.

Nowadays there are different courses on Canada. Basically, they are divided according to students’ specialization. For those who are going to specialize in intercultural communication and translation or cultural studies there is a course «The World of Canada» which still is seen as part of “The world of the English language” and lasts one semester. It gives students an overview about Canada. The students get to know all major events in the history of Canada such as the arrival of Canada’s first people, the colonization of Canada by the French and the British, the settlement of Canada’s West by peoples from Central Europe and czarist Russia, the territorial evolution of Canada. Then they study modern Canada and such important issues as its population including all Aboriginal groups of people, their habits and traditions, biggest cities, immigration and multiculturalism, political and economic structures, trade relations, education and healthcare systems. Those students who study at the department of regional studies at the faculty and specialize in North America have a completely different course of lectures and seminars. They all have lectures on Canada for one semester and later if they choose Canada as the country of their specialization they continue studying it for two years more. At the end of the program they write course and diploma papers.

The course on Canada for specialists is separate and totally different. It is based on regional approach and called “Regions of Canada”. Canada is such a huge and diverse country. This is a country of regions. So this course is aimed at students gaining an appreciation of Canada’s amazing diversity as well as its regional complexity. It also allows students to compare different regions of Canada with those of Russia. Students have to understand the factors that have determined each region’s character, set the direction of its development, and created a sense of place. The regions that are thoroughly studied include: The Atlantic Provinces, Central Canada (Ontario and Quebec), the Prairies, British Columbia and the North. Each region is seen as having a distinct location, physical geography, historical development, and modern life. Special attention is given to unique regional identities shaped over time as people came face to face with challenges presented by their economic, physical, and social environments.

The key element of all these courses is the content-based language instruction (CBI) which helps students to improve and enlarge their knowledge of English. All lectures are given in English and all the discussions with students, all tests and exams are also held in English. It becomes an additional practice of English for the students of the faculty. In that way natural language acquisition occurs in context; natural language is never learned divorced from meaning, and content-based instruction provides a context for meaningful communication to occur (Curtain, 1995; Met, 1991); second language acquisition increases with content-based language instruction, because students learn language best when there is an emphasis on relevant, meaningful content rather than on the language itself; "People do not learn languages and then use them, but learn languages by using them"; however, both form and meaning are important and are not readily separable in language learning (e.g., Lightbown & Spada, 1993; Met, 1991; Wells, 1994). Such program proves to be very successful in terms of results and appreciation.


“The world of Canada” course program:


● Lecture 1. Canada in the world. Symbols of Canada and their meaning. Government and politics.

● Lecture 2. Aboriginal peoples.

● Lecture 3. European colonization. French and British colonies.

● Lecture 4. Confederation and expansion.

● Lecture 5. Canada in the 20th century.

● Lecture 6. Modern times. The diverse population of Canada.

● Lecture 7. Immigration and the policy of multiculturalism.

● Lecture 8. The Growth of Canada’s Large Cities.

● Lecture 9. Discussion: Visible Minorities or Visible Majorities?

● Lecture 10. Economic development of Canada.

● Lecture 11. Regions of Canada.

● Lecture 12. Language Diversity: Regional Differences.

● Lecture 13. Discussion: Regional disparities.

● Lecture 14. Culture of Canada

● Lecture 15. Famous Canadians.

● Lecture 16. Discussion. National stereotypes.

● Lecture 17. Canada-Russia relations

● Exam.



“Regions of Canada” course program:


● Lecture 1. Canada in the world. Symbols of Canada and their meaning. Government and politics.

● Lecture 2. Regionalism of Canada. Core/periphery model. Canada’s regions. Sense of place.

● Lecture 3. The Atlantic Provinces. European colonization. French and British colonies.

● Lecture 4. The Atlantic Provinces. Population and economy. Old and new industries.

● Lecture 5. Central Canada. Ontario and Quebec. Role within Canada.

● Lecture 6. History of Central Canada.

● Lecture 7. Population and economic development of Ontario. Population and economic development of Quebec. Francophone culture.

● Lecture 8. Immigration and the policy of multiculturalism.

● Lecture 9. The Prairies. History. Settlement of the Land. Homesteaders.

● Lecture 10. The Doukhobors.

● Lecture 11. The Prairies today. Population and economic development. Main industries.

● Lecture 12. British Columbia. Physical geography and history.

● Lecture 13. Aboriginal peoples of British Columbia and their traditions.

● Lecture 14. British Columbia today. Population and economic development.

● Lecture 15. The North. Physical geography and history. The search for the Northwest Passage. The economy of the North. The environment. Megaprojects.

● Lecture 16. The Inuit. Culture and traditions. The birth of Nunavut.

● Lecture 17. Canada-Russia relations.

● Final Exam.

Sources:

1. Curtain, H. A., & Pesola, C. A. (1994). Languages and children: Making the match (2nd ed.). NY: Longman.

2. Lightbown, P. M. & Spada, N. (1993). How languages are learned. NY: Oxford

University Press.

3. Met, M. (1991). Learning language through content: Learning content through language. Foreign Language Annals, 24(4), 281-295.

4. Wells, G. (1994). The complementary contributions of Halliday and Vygotsky to a "language-based theory of learning." Linguistics and Education, 6, 41-90.

Suggested reading and resources in English for students:

1. 101 Things Canadians Should Know About Canada / Ed. R. Griffiths. Toronto: Key Porter Books, 2008. 155 p.

2. A Nation of Immigrants: Readings in Canadian History, 1840s-1960s, ed. by Paula Draper, Franca Lacovetta, Robert Ventresca. University of Toronto Press, Scholarly Publishing Division; 1998. 512 p.

3. Axtell J. The Invasion Within: The Contest of Cultures in Colonial North America. New York; Oxford, 1985. 389 p.

4. Berry J.W., Kalin R., Taylor D.M. with the assistance of Lamarche L., Christian J. Multiculturalism and Ethnic Attitudes in Canada. Ottawa: Minister of State for Multiculturalism: Printing and Pub. Supply and Services Canada, 1976-1977. 359 p.

5. Biles J., Burstein М., Frideres J. Making of a Mosaic: A History of Canadian Immigration Policy. University of Toronto Press, Scholarly Publishing Division; 2nd edition, 2010. 672 p.

6. Bone R.M. The regional geography of Canada. Oxford University Press; 5th edition, 2011. 509 p.

7. Burnet J.R., Palmer H. "Coming Canadians": An introd. to a history of Canada's peoples. Toronto: McClelland and Stewart, 1988. 253 p.

8. Douglas R.F., Jones R., Smith D.B. Destinies: Canadian History since Confederation. Toronto: Harcourt Brace & Co., 2nd ed. 1992.

9. Friesen G. Citizens and Nation: An Essay on History, Communication, and Canada.

Toronto; Buffalo; London: University of Toronto Press, 2000. 307 p.

10. Frye N. Divisions on a Ground. Essays on Canadian Culture. Toronto: Anansi, 1982. 199 p.

11. Frye N. The Bush Garden. Essays on the Canadian Imagination. Toronto: Anansi Press, 1971. 256 p.

12. Knowles V. Strangers at Our Gates: Canadian Immigration and Immigration Policy, 1540-2006 Revised Edition. Dundurn; 2007. 312 p.

13. Lanphier C.M., Richmond A.H. Multiculturalism and Identity in Canada outside Quebec // Beyond Quebec. Taking stock of Canada / Ed. by K. McRoberts. Montreal, 1995. P. 317.

14. Lotz J. History of Canada. Greenwich: Mitchell, 1984. 191 p.

15. Ryan P. Multicultiphobia. University of Toronto Press, Scholarly Publishing Division. 2010. 279 p.

16.Mar L.R. Brokering Belonging: Chinese in Canada's Exclusion Era, 1885-1945. Oxford University Press, 2010. – 256 p.

17. Vance J.F. A History of Canadian Culture. Oxford University Press, 2011. 512 p.

28. Walker B. The History of Immigration and Racism in Canada: Essential Readings. Canadian Scholars Press; 2008. 308 p.

 
Нравится Нравится  
Из сборников конференции Россия и Запад:

Школа юного регионоведа


Основная информация
Запись в школу:

Заполните форму по ссылке - запись
E-mail: regionoved2005@yandex.ru
https://vk.com/public149054681


Выпуски журнала "Россия и Запад: диалог культур"

№ 1, 2012 г.  
№ 2, 2013 г.  
№ 3, 2013 г.  
№ 4, 2013 г.  
№ 5, 2014 г.  
№ 6, 2014 г.  
№ 7, 2014 г.  
№ 8, 2015 г.  
№ 9, 2015 г.  
№ 10, 2016 г.  
№ 11, 2016 г.  
№ 12, 2016 г.  
  № 13, 2016 г.  
№ 14, 2017 г.  
 
№ 15, 2017 г.